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Saturday, December 14, 2013

College students (and more) come together to protest against privatization and censorship





All over Korea, people (mainly driven by college students) are holding protests and putting up handwritten posters against the privatization of railroads and health care. The theme of the protests are handwritten posters with the phrase "I am not okay" to drive home the point of society being censored and pressured into staying quiet/passive when asked questions like "How are you?".

One sociology major said, "Our society has difficulty differentiating between what is 'different' and what is 'wrong'. We tend to overlook what is 'wrong' to be 'different'. We need to be able to tell the government that it is 'wrong' to dismiss railroad union members for disagreeing with the privatization. I am here today because I refuse to stay silent. I hope that we will all be okay."

Another student said, "Our college demands that we remain oblivious to issues regarding our government and society. We're all just as frustrated (with this censorship) so I'm here today to say that I am not okay."

Others said similar things to the line of, "I have to block the privatization of the railroads for my life to be okay", "I am not okay because I am embarrassed to have my child born in this country", "I am not okay because our society has taken away my right to express my anger towards injustice", "Is a society just when I need to be brave just to have my voice heard?", "I am not okay because I live in a society that censors me"...


SHINee's Jonghyun also changed his profile picture to a handwritten poster by a political science student who wrote that she was not okay because of society's homophobia towards her being a bisexual transgender (examples listed are Kim Jo Kwang Soo's wedding registration being rejected, the government trying to change school textbooks to include arguments against homosexuality, and the failure to illegalize discrimination).

Translation of parts I found impactful:

<I am not okay no matter what name you call me by> "Yes, I am a sexual minority. I am a male to female transgender and bisexual. I am a woman. I am part of a generation struggling with employment. By what other names could you possibly call me by? It would be endless to list them all here. It is not only me, however, who lives on being called all sorts of names today.

But as of this moment, I am not okay no matter what name I am called by. I am not okay with a Korean society that cannot illegalize discrimination, that treats the discrimination against sexual minorities as a fact of life, that promotes misogyny, that treats the younger generation as its slave, that forces college students to focus not on their education but on their employment. By what name could I be called in order to be okay?

Someone asked us this: how are you? How am I? Are we all okay with feeling relieved that another's pain is not my own, with covering our ears and closing our eyes to protect our lives? How can we be okay in a world that censors us?

I am not telling all of you to flood out into the streets and throw bricks. I am simply asking that when you are asked if you are okay today, to look around at the expressions of the faces of the people around you and call out their names. I feel that as the world gets lonelier, the answer to us all being okay lies closer to one another. Please ask the person beside you. How are you?"

After finding out that Jonghyun set it as his profile picture, the student tweeted, "SHINee's Jonghyun put my poster as his Twitter profile picture... I'm at a loss for words. I can't believe it even with my own eyes. I'm a SHINee fan from today on."

Article: SHINee's Jonghyun joins 'How are you?' changes his profile Twitter picture

Source: OSEN via Naver

1. [+268, -21] It's something difficult to do as a public figure, very amazing of him

2. [+251, -16] I think Jonghyun put the focus of his action on promoting equality, not necessarily politics. Not only as a celebrity but as an idol.. I think it's amazing that he participated in something like this. It's rare to see an idol use Twitter for right things lately. Truly amazing.

3. [+214, -12] What an amazing person... I'm learning something from him today.

4. [+185, -6] Seems like a person with a healthy and definite view on life. I agree with the saying that being different is not wrong.

5. [+184, -7] A difficult decision as a singer.. but I'm really proud of him!!

-

Source: Naver + Instiz

-

1. [+8,256, -647] Please lend your ears to what they have to say.. I am not okay with not being able to be where my friends, seniors, and juniors have come together.

2. [+7,448, -531] Find strength. You are our hope. Continue moving forward.

3. [+6,811, -474] Show that Korea is not dead.

4. [+6,434, -448] I am against the privatization!

5. [+5,312, -345] Fighting!!!!

6. [+1,866, -109] And yet in the news, I do not even see the word 'how' of the question 'how are you?'...

7. [+1,690, -113] As a college student myself, I feel so proud and support the railway walkout and the students!! There are handwritten posters at my college as well, and more are planning to be put up on Monday!

8. [+1,676, -115] Who can be okay in this administration. So proud of our youth.

9. [+1,611, -78] Why isn't this in the news?

10. [+1,594, -81] I had hoped for the news to pick up on this protest but even the internet is trying to bury it. Find strength everyone.

-

225 comments:

  1. Fight for your rights!!

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  2. So proud of Jonghyun, wish other celebrities had the courage to support the cause too!!

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  3. 9. [+1,611, -78] Why isn't this in the news?



    cause the mainstream news is controlled by the government and the college students + others are protesting the government.


    ahh~ u gotta love corruption.

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  4. Jonghyun just earned my respect. A great man and great person.

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  5. buddha bless jonghyun

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  6. I love it when the youngsters gather up like this.

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  7. Mercury & PerfectionDecember 14, 2013 at 8:05 PM

    I'm proud of the korean netizens that stepping up and taking action and I'm especially proud of Jonghyun.


    This might be a small step but it's a beginning. There is hope and it's amazing seeing people united for human rights!!


    They might never see this but FIGHTING!!

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  8. *korean people instead of korean netizens.. they actually marching and protesting in the streets, not just talking about it online

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  9. Mercury & PerfectionDecember 14, 2013 at 8:08 PM

    Oh yeah right I'm so used to netizens, I'll correct it ^_^

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  10. I really hope more people like Jonghyun join in. That would really help make a difference.

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  11. Fight for what you believe because you have hope it might become a reality. I am proud of all these people.

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  12. SHINee's Jonghyun also changed his profile picture to a handwritten
    poster by a political science student who wrote that she was not okay
    because of society's homophobia towards her being a bisexual transgender
    (examples listed are Kim Jo Kwang Soo's wedding registration being
    rejected, the government trying to change school textbooks to include
    arguments against homosexuality, and the failure to illegalize
    discrimination).

    Jonghyun you are the best ! <3

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  13. 1. Jonghyun did a good job http://omonatheydidnt.livejournal.com/12210067.html
    2. I wish they would win over government, Fighting!!

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  14. Jonghyun also privately messaged the person who wrote the essay he's using as his twitter picture. I really respect him.



    http://jonqfi.tumblr.com/post/69994696004/eunhafree-realjonghyun90

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  15. it's not sin to stand for your right keep fighting till the end
    so proud of jonghyun right now

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  16. LOL Korean youth protests has no fighting in them, so tamed compared to other protests in the world e.g. brazil, italy, turkey...^^

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  17. oh I love the idea: "annyeonghaseyo?" turned into "annyeongha-ji anda"

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  18. Holy shit! about time.

    Privatisation of businesses is often messed up and the end, they only people benefiting are the government,

    and the last article with the picture... whoever you are, i seriously applaud you...like major respect and thank you to Jonghyun who uploaded the picture. It's nice to see Koreans actually being vocal about the things that have a major impact in their lives. from Misogyny- sexuality and health+ many more.

    “People shouldn't be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people.”

    screw censorship.

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  19. Someone asked us this: how are you? How am I? Are we all okay with feeling relieved that another's pain is not my own, with covering our ears and closing our eyes to protect our lives? How can we be okay in a world that censors us?

    This.

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  20. I'd really proud of those college students. Keep fighting.

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  21. Really proud of these students and workers standing up for their rights. I hope the government listens to the people and things turn out better for South Korea than it did for Britain during Thatchers era.

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  22. DansheenMasheenChenDecember 14, 2013 at 8:14 PM

    Forever staying Jonghyun's fan for this.

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  23. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre

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  24. Jjong ah... haha lmao. Vote jjong for president

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  25. We often call out Koreans for being ignorant, call out their society issues, and call out for many other things as if it happenes only in Korea. South Korea have made an amazing, magical, tremendous economic jump in the last fifty years. A lot of issues they face today in their society is an outcome of a jump in economic world. People's mind, mind of 50mil people of different generations cant be changed as fast economy.
    I am really glad that they are not letting this one to go away. We have to be heard in order to make changes and improve. I hope they will fight until the end and wont let corrupted politicians play their dirty games once again. Proud of u Korea! There is a reason why they achieved so much in 50 years.

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  26. whats that got to do with it...! it happened in the 80's.

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  27. Respect Kim Jonghyun ! Respect !

    Such a sweet of you

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  28. Wow. I can't express how much respect I have for Jonghyun because of this. I hope that we'll see more Korean celebrities and influential figures showing support for these kind of issues in the future.

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  29. Good on him for not being afraid to have a brave opinion! Hopefully this will also lead his fans to be more aware and open minded, and get them thinking on different issues. I respect idols who use their influence to encourage social awareness.

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  30. maybe now people will stop hating jonghyun because he's "annoying". proud of these students, and good on jonghyun for bringing up issues that most Korean celebs would shy away from talking about.

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  31. massacres tend to stop people from become violent at protests

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  32. The daughter of a dictator leading a country. Stands to reason her administration would make shit decisions as well. Politicians are all liars and yet people still pick sides when all you're probably doing is just making a choice over the lesser evil.

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  33. I used fighting as spirit not actual fighting and if you think above youth has spirit you guys havent watched the news this year...and almost every country masaccres happened unfortunately. for me fighting spirit is something like this ( istanbul 2013) mind you turkey is a muslim country.

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  34. So much respect to these people for coming out and questioning and debating their government instead of just quietly accepting everything that they're told. Respect to Jonghyun too for for using his influence to make more people think about equality and respect. Some idols just want to be safe and conervative, I'm glad Jonghyun's doing something different.

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  35. I wish young people in my country would be more involved in their government like these students are. It's really sad that no one seems to know or care about what happens in Politics Land >.<

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  36. korean youth protests have a lot of "fighting". but it's just this massacre only happened 33 years ago. the south korean government and army terrorized a whole city, it's own citizens because of student protests. many of the people who survived are still alive, some are probably parents of university age children. think about it. terror at the consequences of what may happen is a powerful tool in stopping protests from getting too big, or even forming.

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  37. Proud of Jonghyun. It's always really great to see when young people gather together to support a cause.

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  38. I hope their government listens unlike ours. We're have a pretty similar issue with selling power plants rather than running them ourselves. If the government does go against the wishes of the people for a second big issue the protests I can't imagine.


    The first big issue was allowing companies and agencies to look at private things such as emails, private messages on facebook/twitter etc... They passed that despite the high percentage of people who didn't want that.

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  39. I know. I also watched sandglass... it doesnt change my mind sorry. look what happened in turkey and how goverment and police terrorized everyone just this summer... and how people fought against the president... but this is not political website so I'll shut up. but I hope koreans at least show some creavity.

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  40. 2013 - Year of Revolution. Year of Protests. #ProudOfSociety for finally wake up and fight for their own rights.

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  41. I could see Jonghyun becoming a politician but you know a good one

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  42. "How are you?"

    "I am not okay"



    oh my god
    i got goosebump

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  43. Someone told me earlier today that he might have lost some fans because of the stance he took on the LGBT issues in that profile picture...
    And all I could think was, "Imagine all the people who end up BECOMING his fan after reading that."

    Seriously, major props to him for being brave and posting that, it's not easy for idols to be honest at any time. I wish these college students and the public the best in their fight against these privatization/censorship issues, it's a step in the right direction.

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  44. i hope more entertainers stand up against this, it's them the government keeps directly targeting each time they release a scandal to hide their own sins

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  45. Maybe because I'm young but does someone mind explaining to me what it's about? I'm kind of confused heh...I read through it a few times and I don't want to be ignorant by asking so, but can someone just explain it to me in like really simple words? $:

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  46. Little Freak 'ㅂ'*December 14, 2013 at 8:41 PM

    After finding out that Jonghyun set it as his profile picture, the student tweeted, "SHINee's Jonghyun put my poster as his Twitter profile picture... I'm at a loss for words. I can't believe it even with my own eyes. I'm a SHINee fan from today on."

    Good job KJH, good job XD

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  47. me either hope that more public well-known people like jonghyun would join in. Now is the best time to repay the fans.

    Students and workers would be the most surferers from rising transportation prices due to privatation.

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  48. BEST ARTICLE ON THIS SITE.
    jjong i am prohd of you!♡

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  49. same it's a simple message and yet so powerful

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  50. It's super sweet that he took the time to make sure she was okay with him publicizing her letter even more. He didn't assume that she'd be okay with it or thankful with it, he made sure it was okay.




    I WANT. GIMME. SO SWEEEEEET.

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  51. korea may appear to be a liberal society, but it's actually pretty conservative. the government censors a lot of stuff (which is why this issue isn't in the press), and people are arguing that just because something's different, doesn't mean it's wrong. people are discouraged for speaking out against "the norm" as well. also, privatizing railroads and healthcare would make them uber expensive, and not accessible by everyone (it would also make the people who own them mega ultra rich, which isn't fair, and also not good for the economy). college students are protesting against this because they actually have the balls to, which is good :D. something like that

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  52. usually protests are lead by college/university students. i hope they are able to get a dialogue with the government and have a youth representative. sometimes the young can have more impact as they come into a new age.

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  53. I am definitely proud of these college students standing up against the privatization and I respect them all for it. I really hope their voices are heard.


    I especially respect SHINee's Jonghyun for standing up for LGBT issues. It actually doesn't surprise me that he DID say something about it (even if he just use the poster as his twitpic) since Jonghyun has been vocal about what he thinks. Probably the only idol I would have guessed to say something.

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  54. Amazing of government to be able to bury all this issue and news not to be on TV. Korea still seems to be not that open to public opinions yet.

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  55. This is really interesting. I hope people in my country will wake up soon too.

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  56. he was asked before if he could what minister he would be he said the minister of gender equality

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  57. I'm not here for the protest.


    I'M JUST HERE FOR THE VIOLENCE!!

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  58. Someone tell this person on omona and anyone else complaining that she violated his privacy that she asked Jonghyun for permission to post his DM and he "gladly gave his consent."

    "I received this message from SHINee member Jonghyun @realjonghyun90. When I asked if it would be okay to post such supportive words, he gladly gave his consent. Thank you so much. I will be strong!" (https://twitter.com/eunhafree/status/411913077441835008)

    http://omonatheydidnt.livejournal.com/12317545.html?thread=1156405865#t1156405865

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  59. I wish the young people in the United States were as politically active as these young adults in S. Korea. Many of the younger generation in America have become so used to the rights available to us in our country that in other countries, our rights are actually privileges, even deprived privileges for other people. Yet, in America, the voter turnout or even interest in politics is abysmal. I've encountered college students that are in the process of obtaining their Master Degrees from well-known institutions that don't even know who the first president of the United States was or what the Constitution and Declaration of Independence are.


    How I wish that the young people in America would also be as active as these young adults in S. Korea who are fighting for their rights and future.

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  60. Wow! Park Gun Hye is messing up!
    Fighting Everyone!
    It was really brave of that student to write that and kind of the shinee guy to support her!

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  61. Proud of the students , keep fighting ! and good work Jonghyun, i'm so happy that he's using his SNS for good use. The DM message was really considerate and sweet.

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  62. it reminds me of Koizora/Sky Of Love (it's a Japanese drama)
    there's a scene when the girl asked the boy

    "Were you ever happy ?"
    "I was once very happy."

    i fucking cried

    http://gifrific.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Troy-Community-Emotions.gif

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  63. bless him for being socially aware

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  64. Excuse me... WHAT?! This wasn't in the news??
    After all Korea still seems to be corrupt and full of lobbyism (?)

    But my heart goes out to these students... people.. protesting for their rights!

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  65. After his exchange with the Ministry of science and the phone law i wouldn't be surprised lol

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  66. I know that those that come here are more interested in the celebrities than the people, but before they applaud Jonghyun (who I am very proud of right now), I hope they applaud the efforts of the many students putting themselves out on the line. The danger Jonghyun puts himself in as a celebrity who supports them is very little compared to the dangers the students themselves are in.

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  67. To be honest, lately, Jonghyun seems to be one of the people who I had been starting respect...but this, this has earned it. Jonghyun is not afraid of his idol image or whatever and is giving his own opinion and fighting(?) against the government. I will support him in the future for success!

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  68. I thought young people in the US is pretty active politically? Also, I think everywhere in the world (sadly) there are youngsters who are not interested in politics as well.

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  69. Thanks a lot for the explanation :D It helped a lot, I understand it a bit now haha

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  70. Public broadcasting stations and mainstream news are controlled by government and since these students/people are protesting government..... it only come out as online articles, I guess

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  71. and I think he tried to encourage the youth to go vote last year too

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  72. also, you're not ignorant. when you're willing to acknowledge that you may be ignorant, you automatically become aware

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  73. People have a negative reputation of him because he very confident on stage but off stage he's really sweet and sensitive . Idk why people have this 'misconception' of him but hopefully everyone realizes now.

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  74. Aww ' i support you for speaking out that different doesn't mean wrong' that really got to me .

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  75. yeah .... the strength to say 'I'm not okay', it takes a lot of courage to say, I'm proud of these students/people.

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  76. And we still have hope. Even Jonghyun who simply changed his picture is helping bring awareness and empowerment. I'm proud to those who can stand up in what they believe in.

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  77. Sorry, but as a Brazilian, I have something to say. The protests began here in a big city (São Paulo) because of the price increase on public transport. However, the protests across the country had many causes (seriously, for example the abolition of taxes, against the corruption, etc) and no real leadership (it was a mess tbqh).
    It is ironic that some people began protesting against the World Cup when taxpayer money had been spent on it (we should protest before, but the logic of some people...). It is ironic that many people were against corruption, but they don't remember whom they voted in the last election (voting is compulsory here) and/or vote for anyone (eg a comedian because he is funny). It is ironic that some were against the amount of public expenditure, but the violent protests only generated more public expenditure thanks to vandalism.
    I wish my country has political consciousness, but this is far from happening. Sorry my broken english.

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  78. I know it's all k-pop obsessed teen girls here, so it was inevitable for everybody to immediately jump on the idol angle. But it is still disappointing.

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  79. wow good for him! he's really putting his twitter account to good use

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  80. Wow...I'm loving how people are taking a stand for this and props to Jonghyun for supporting that poli-sci student's statement on homophobia in Korea...like mad props.

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  81. "he might have lost some fans because
    of the stance he took on LGBT issues with that profile picture"


    Like omg...I think he took a step in the right direction - if he lost fans - pft w/e he's gained some too, now. (including me). LOL

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  82. netizenbuzz isn't the place you should go to have serious discussions about korean politics..

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  83. I am beyond proud of what Jonghyun did, but I am also proud of the people who are going out and protesting this. I hope more celebrities come out in support of this. I hope the people that are protesting will be able to make the change they seek or at least get Korea on the right track.

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  84. I hope they will all be okay. Those are the top comments and there are hundreds of comments supporting them, but hundreds more (downvoted) are calling them communists, north koreans, disrespectful ingrates, saying they should all be shot for protesting. Things aren't as peaceful as they seem here. Please give them your support!

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  85. ^^ This. LOL yup. Only some users on here have extensive knowledge of history, war, politics. First one that comes to mind: Black_Plague.

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  86. it's great that sns can also be used the right way by idols. i hope others will follow jonghyun's example.
    and it's just as awesome that so many young people/students are trying to make a difference. this whole censorship thing and trying to bury issues underneath others, less meaningless ones really needs to change and i wish them all the best with their effort!

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  87. I lost my words... fighting korean people

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  88. I don't know if I'm the only one, and I don't know how this will reflect on my person, but you guys know the phrase "straight until proven gay"? I think that of Korean people but with other terms: "homophobic until proven otherwise". Is it too far-fetched? Am I being a little extreme? Judgmental? I know that as a foreigner I couldn't dream of the of littlest nuance of another culture, but doing research, talking to people, reading article after article, getting acquiesced with side of the gay movement in Korea, it just seems like the majority of them are homophobic, in varying degrees but still.


    Jonghyun has got off that list, I would be glad to know more about idols that are more open-minded like that.

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  89. Most youths in Korea don't hate LGBT.
    It's always older generations and fundamental Christians in Korea that cause conflicts.

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  90. So the mainstream news in Korea are controlled by the government. Wow. So glad at least here in Indonesia we can still see some news might not be liked by the (corrupt) government. But of course i think those people still want to do something with the media tho. I know it :)).

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  91. 2013 is really the year of protests, it makes me really happy that people do not just accept the things that the govermnet imposes but stand up and fight for their rights.
    And wow, I love Jonghyun so much, I'm so proud of being his fan *cries* As a feminist and a supporter of the LGBT rights, I'm feel extremely proud of him for his braveness to standing up and say his mind since that's so rare almongest korean celebs and idols even more.

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  92. Student protesting is part of Korean Culture, they are fine. They've been doing this for years, they know what they are doing.

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  93. How are they North Koreans for protesting? That's kind of twisted..

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  94. See happy to see thee protests.. I really hope more of these happens around Korea in the future. I can imagine how tired the average student/person is of society and the govt especially treating them like trash.


    And Jonghyun earned a new fan.

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  95. Are you saying we shouldn't support them because my generation is just another generation doing the same thing we've always done?

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  96. Bless. Wow. I had no idea he was this likable, but I've never paid attention to members like that.

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  97. I LOVE THAT MANGA, I didn't know they made it into a drama XD Going to find it

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  98. No you can support them. I'm saying you don't have to worry much about their safety. The government won't do anything. You know of the Gwangju Massacre? The govt won't dare hurt these students

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  99. Younger people are usually politically active in the US, it happens quite a bit. At least I know it does in California.

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  100. Can people stop talking about Jonghyun instead of talking about this issue. UGH

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  101. Sigh. You are going for the dramatic angle. I am speaking of exams being affected, the reputation at school, blemishes on their records, trouble at school... You are being quiet naive if you think physical violence is it when it comes to what the government can do to someone.

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  102. As an outsider who only see how korean community works from afar, I gotta admit that this is one big change on movement of them. Its great to see the youth being passionate to change.

    As a SHINee fan from the start, I feel like proud mother to Jonghyun. While many people use SNS to fooling around, he's been using it to pay attention to regulation and humanity event around him. He helps spreading awareness to youth who's sometimes too uninterested to follow news and focused on entertainment instead. So proud, Jonghyun, definitely so proud.

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  103. Many friends of mine from different fandom had to admit that Jonghyun is one hell of a brave idol. It's not easy to stated your opinion like that in a country with a "different is awful" culture like SK.

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  104. R.E.S.P.E.C.T!!

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  105. I still don't think it will. Because like I said protesting is ingrained in their culture, they probably know how to deal with it. Knowing how important education is in Korea these students would not be protesting if they felt their futures and their education were at stake.

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  106. I hope for the best for these students and protesters!~ I've always been Jong Hyun biased and my respect levels for him were always somewhat high, but now they're freaking astronomical. Proud of the protesters and Jong Hyun.

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  107. Ah, get off your high horse. Of course most would jump at the idol angle- but the fact that his actions and this site's discussion is triggering international awareness/interest- even in the smallest way- is significant I think.

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  108. This is so heartwarming. I wish all the persons in the world do this, we should fight for equality.

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  109. Or there could be some signs saying "I'm not okay because there are things more important than exams." Some of my friends skipped the protests to study. I'm sorry, but are you Korean? I really hate to get confrontational, but there are things at stake that you don't seem to be getting.

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  110. south korean government pretty much calls anyone who speaks against them "communists".

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  111. I'm not Korean but I'm proud of them for not being afraid to voice their opinions in a way that matters. It's not easy to get out there in person or even put your name out there in a fight that could potentially have a negative impact on your life.
    The only way change happens is if people are willing to step out of their comfort zones and fight the things they believe in.
    I hope they know they are inspiring people that are not even affected by the main issues presented here.

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  112. How I wish I can do the same in my country too. This protest is really impactful and heartwarming. Having a protest in my country is near impossible as people have to apply for license to organise a protest (ikr, wth).

    Anyway, I loved the translation of the transgender post. People often disciminate them because they are the minority and overlook the fact that they have feelings too. By calling them names just because they are different hurt them greatly. We have to raise awareness of these people that they are just like you and me, and sexual preference or gender do not matter at all, because it is a matter of choice, and everyone has the right to choose. They have the courage to open up and not hide them, and this courage is admirable. Courage is not about having no fear,but overcoming something that you are very fearful about. Why are we disciminating these courageous people? For religious purpose? Religion is shaped by people, we interpret the religious verses, and the forms of interpretation may be hurting these groups of people. Acceptance is necessary for a better and more peaceful world.

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  113. I think we can say that about a lot of youth around the world cause I know it's true in my own country (United States).
    But it's true, it's mainly the older ones in Korea... the younger ones seem okay with it a lot of the time but netizens online have skewed my perspective a bit lol

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  114. Hi do you remember me? I guess its just a couple days ago we discussed on the development of Korean society in accordance with its industrial advancement. I talked about how maybe it just need more time, and i'm very glad that the movement seems like has started. I know it won't be easy, it probably will have people being victimized, but as cliche as it may sound, the good will always find a way to win it. Students protesting is a comming thing all over the world, but those who usually win it are those who gain general public support. And it might be something to consider, how to reach the general pubblic with the messages, as the news not broadcasting these and older generation won't be in the internet that much.
    I always love commenting in NB because i can talk about everything, not just idols, and i guess a lot of other people also feel the same way.

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  115. Also, whether or not you agree or disagree with people being transgendered, you have to respect Jonghyun for posting something so controversial given his career and how one wrong move could end it. I think his post and thoughts come from the heart as well. It's nice to see that not all idols are afraid to stand up for what they feel is right even in the face of potential criticism.

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  116. he's the kind of person who stand for what's right before with ministry of science and also when someone sell his personal info and now

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  117. Respect to them for trying to speak up. I know this article/cause is not about Jonghyun but I hope other celebrities also take part in these things, their influence can change a lot.

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  118. The funny thing is, i'd actually found a lot of people in NB knows more than 'just' about idols. Hence, i often discussed about politics, history, social issues etc here.

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  119. Wow. You go protesters. Get the job done. It's time Korea progressed like this.

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  120. I love what Jonghyun said. Makes me proud of him in so many ways. And he was already my bias just makes me even more happy.

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  121. No I'm not Korean but I've taken Korean culture courses & many of my friends are Korean international students.

    There is absolutely no need to get confrontational. I'm just saying you don't need to worry so much that is all. If I'm bothering you I'll just delete my comments.

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  122. More like anything that is against South Korea as a whole, really. Though anything that's pro-North, is bound to get some pretty stiff reactions.

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  123. BeiSandy isn't exactly wrong either, though I think both of you are making good points.


    I do however, hope that the protest doesn't turn violent. There's been more than enough cases where people actually deliberately made things violent, both police and protestors themselves (easily distinguished by wearing facial masks in the scene).


    The fact that the riot control units aka 'Combat Police' has been disbanded makes things a bit uncertain in how protests going out of control will go.

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  124. I don't find anything wrong with praising Jonghyun. It certainly took a lot of guts to do it. A tweet I read said "김종현 씨의 팬들이 플픽을 바꾼 김종현 씨를 존경하고 지지하는 것이 아니라, 그들이 사랑하는 김종현 씨처럼 그 대자보를 쓴 사람을 지지하고 그 사람의 용기를 훌륭하다 말해주면 얼마나 좋을까"


    "Rather his fans than praising and respecting Kim Jonghyun, wouldn't it be nice if his fans praised and respected the student who wrote the declaration for her bravery the way their beloved Kim Jonghyun did?"


    That is what I would consider ideal.

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  125. I really adore SHINee, and I hope other celebrities can follow Jonghyun's example.


    Yoseob did a great job promoting the organization that is supporting the comfort women, as have other idols who also used their popularity for good efforts. I wish there were more celebrities like them.

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  126. KBS is the one that's directly owned by the government while the stock owners of MBC is also largely government. It's nothing new really though. Government control and influence in media in South Korea has been present for decades now, though it was at its most restrictive during Chun's regime.


    SBS is the only one (to my knowledge anyway) that isn't pro-government, entirely.

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  127. Government are not responsible to you being unemployed due to being transgender though?

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  128. It would be nice to see Lee Joon say something. He seems very outspoken.

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  129. maybe in the part of the US you are? my impression is a lot more young people are active. plus you cant really compare when you think how large the US is, both population and area. much harder to rally people and bring a united front with that.

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  130. I think Lee Joon is the type that thinks a lot but is selective about what he says because he knows what his image is. His image is harmless and genuine and childlike, which is why he can say things like "I also stripped for popularity so we shouldn't put women down while praising me!" It's a little foolish, but taken to be genuine, in part because of the self-diss, and he comes off like a child that thinks of things at their basic levels.

    This is a different mountain to tackle altogether, and while he could say something and have it be taken seriously, it would also reduce his effectiveness on other subjects because he will become an idol that is more political and less "innocent." On the other hand, Joon could be seen as someone who is blabbering without knowing the subject matter (because of his fool-concept).


    I think it would ultimately do more harm than good for his image and any other efforts he publicly supports in the future.

    Jonghyun is known to be closer to a normal netizen, which is why he can speak up for something like this and it carries weight. He's another person on the internet who looks these things up.

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  131. I'm not basing it on the region but based on statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Voting amongst young people have decreased since the last 2008 election (less than 45%) whereas voting amongst the elderly have increased (more than 70%). It's not the young generation that's controlling the country, it's the elderly people who want to secure their benefits while leaving nothing else for the upcoming generations. Because there are more elderly people for the voter turnout, they are the ones who have more say in which policies/decisions/etc. get passed, because they elect the politicians that they believe will benefit them. Because there aren't as many young people actually going to the polls, the young people in the U.S. cannot secure our own future because we're not doing anything about it.

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  132. Public awareness is the first step for this endeavor to be successful. Him using his status, especially since his audience are mostly young adults (persons in the age range of 20 to 40)
    are the people who are part of this campaign

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  133. the government should pass laws against discrimination of the LGBT ;)


    The first step, for a country against them, is to get rid of the mentality against LGBT. So they are speaking up.


    This campaign "How are you?" is not just about privatization, it has grown to encompass various issues that the SK youth are putting to light, and wanting to correct..

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  134. 2. [+251, -16] I think Jonghyun put the focus of his action on promoting
    equality, not necessarily politics. Not only as a celebrity but as an
    idol.. I think it's amazing that he participated in something like this.
    It's rare to see an idol use Twitter for right things lately. Truly
    amazing.

    Even more amazing that this is coming from SM idol. Good on you!!!

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  135. they did a movie and a drama, movie is a precious one ♥

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  136. Because aggressive losers have lots of free time and tend to hate everyone, they usually get the best replies first.

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  137. In our country, we can't even go out to the streets and protest openly............

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  138. idols have no business in politics, he should be practicing his singing instead of wasting time on things he dont understand

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  139. Idols are human beings too. I assume that when they reach voting age they have to vote.



    I assume when they reach an age when they are eligible they must serve two years in their national army. Politics is very much a part of everyday life and that includes idol life too. Face facts.

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  140. Let's just praise them all, they are all in it for the same cause, it does not matter who needs more praising or recognition.


    The student for standing up, Jonghyun for raising awareness and supporting, his fans for supporting his cause and being sympathetic.

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  141. How do you know he doesn't understand this situation? Despite being an idol, he also a legal korea citizen, born and raised in korea... what makes him shouldn't do or support things he thinks right?

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  142. LeoSlaysAllofyourFavesDecember 14, 2013 at 11:56 PM

    Miura Haruma * Drool * :L

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  143. He just earned my respect and a new fan

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  144. 내가 제일 잘나가December 15, 2013 at 12:09 AM

    To be honest, violence and riots in protests usually start BECAUSE of the police. So if they are not around, it will be less likely to kick off

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  145. It's understandable that you're annoyed but you also have to realize that he's one of very very few idols who have outwardly spoken up for LBGT, especially when you compare it to the idols have said questionable/ignorant things instead. It's not a bad thing that people are happy to see some honesty beyond the play-it-safe idol image.

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  146. I actually didn't mentioned Jonghyun at all, i actually just stating the obvious about reaching out to the general public, but i get what you are saying. All the best for Korea.

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  147. Lol and yet he's one of the idols that actually can sing. Good job looking like an ignorant troll. If you're gonna be one, at least be one that spew out justifiable idiocy, not generalized stupidity.

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  148. Miura is a flawless human being , when he went to Korea to have a pictorial with Park Shinhye, oh that was perfect ♥

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  149. Idols, much like every human, have business in politics. And honestly what he stood up for was something we all should understand and support that being different isn't wrong...or did you not know what he was talking about.

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  150. 내가 제일 잘나가December 15, 2013 at 12:50 AM

    YES! When the Arab Springs started I was so proud it was indescribable and I don't even have no Arabic blood in me at all. #prayingforSyria

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  151. wow.
    so much respect for jonghyun right now.
    I'm a huge shawol and seeing someone I admire so much do this is just..wow.

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  152. but younger voters (ranges from 18-24) have always had a higher turnout at the polls. Now idk if your referring to smaller elections (not the presidential one's) because that way I can agree that more younger people should vote in state elections

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  153. Damn, I like Jonghyun even more now.

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  154. 내가 제일 잘나가December 15, 2013 at 12:58 AM

    When I see things like this it gives me so much hope. It makes me want to work for my degree even harder so that I can help with situations like this in the future. I hope they stick this out, if there is enough noise and pressure, the government will have no choice but to listen. Hopefully the 'I'm Not Okay' campaign will give the citizens esp the older ones a life which is less suffocating by the pressures of society since everyone is stating their problems out in the open.


    I really hope the feminists and gender equality people take this opportunity of not not only political but cultural change to voice they're opinions more clearly. Many people in Korea have always said there are issues in their country but it seems now it is reaching boiling point. And SHINee are such amazing guys (2nd bias group after BB haha), Onew, Bling Bling and esp. Key are the type of if they want to say something... they pretty much will.

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  155. My granddad was in the national police force for nearly 20 years, including during Chun's regime, so I'm easily well aware how things went - and suffice to say, there were undoubtedly plenty of people who were simply looking for trouble simply the fun of it, hatred against the police because they were offenders themselves or felt it would be a wise idea to hit back with stuff that can actually kill and wound seriously than a baton - i.e. like bricks, rocks, Molotov cocktails, furniture and so on.

    I've already said the police aren't innocent, but to blame violence and riots on them all the time or even most of the time is far-fetched. The London riots in August 2011 for example, occurred because some twat teenager threw a champagne bottle at the police, nor did it escalate to a riot because police got violent on protesters first.

    But if you go as far as to end up getting rowdy, confrontational or strike a police officer, don't deserve anything friendly from the latter. Here's also a list of some incidences where protestors themselves have done awfully ridiculous things that are hardly anywhere near peaceful and are flat-out intentions to meet violence with violence, which gets nowhere but bruised faces and broken bones for BOTH sides.

    http://www.who-sucks.com/people/the-exciting-world-of-south-korean-protests

    http://gopkorea.blogs.com/flyingyangban/2004/02/rioting_is_as_k.html

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/07/21/south-korean-auto-workers_n_242251.html

    http://articles.latimes.com/1989-05-03/news/mn-2468_1_riot-police-gas-and-batons-radical-students

    Bottom line - Want to protest peacefully? Then don't go attacking or confronting police officers even if they come down at you first and isolate the radicals in your ranks, because it then completely defeats the purpose of a peaceful protest.

    Getting rid of the whole riot control force was a dear mistake. In the inevitable scenario where the 2 Koreas reunite as well, protests are likely to grow even worse and more violent, and having no police riot control to deal with it is a huge boon.

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  156. "Were you ever happy ?"
    "I was once very happy"

    this is just....
    http://i.imgur.com/uWvGs9M.gif

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  157. Losing all hope is freedom

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOlRI7WXcTQ

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  158. why S.K called a democratize country (?) [Sorry my english is bad] when its people can't speak their mind? What's the point calling itself a democratize ...

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  159. 1. Political dissent is not a crime, technically speaking. It isn't a crime to speak out against the government or anyone in the govt for the matter, unless you plan on going violent or do something that's considered treason.

    2. You can still vote who you want to put in power. S. Korea isn't a dictatorship or a single-party state where your choices are either severely restricted or basically zero, with power in the hands of just one person and his/her friends and family.

    SK's northern neighbor doesn't have any of those 2 things - and it was those two things that pro-democracy protesters wanted and fought for in the past (if not, the ONLY 2 things they wanted), as the military dictatorships had none of those - they did have elections, though they were hugely rigged.


    It's not the best democracy, of course, though I'd take it over trying to live in North Korea where as much as a single word of dissent can lead you and family getting put in prison or worse, the death penalty.

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  160. best of luck guys

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  161. Wait, was it the one with Aragaki Yui and Miura Haruma? Or was that the movie?

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  162. Omg he's amazing.

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  163. "Jonghyun is supporting gay rights
    Onew is donating to the north
    Key is helping orphanages
    Taemin is donating rice and has a dep thought on adopting
    Minho wears an ‘end poverty’ bracelet

    I love you all."

    cr: tumblr






    Good God, I knew I chose the right bias group

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  164. LeoSlaysAllofyourFavesDecember 15, 2013 at 3:29 AM

    Aragaki Yui and Miura Haruma did the movie
    The drama was with Seto Koji

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  165. so is he himself "bi" or what since he says he's in the minority?

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  166. I had hoped NB would translate this instead http://news.naver.com/main/read.nhn?mode=LSD&mid=sec&oid=421&aid=0000597642&sid1=001&lfrom=twitter but this one will do, I'm glad to see that people are commending him for his brave action!! Change is never too late, I hope I can endeavour for the same cause here in my country.

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  167. Same... starting to think NB truly doesn't like SHINee at all.

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  168. "as an entertainer, another kind of minority facing the public"
    he meant his being celebrity

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  169. I'm confused why NB didn't translate some of the really big articles on Jonghyun... seems like a pretty big deal to me and there are some with the top comments having over 4000 upvotes.

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  170. Is it possible that she translated it from when the article just broke out and had only a few likes?

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  171. Little Freak 'ㅂ'*December 15, 2013 at 4:23 AM

    plz -_- don't be like that -_-

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  172. Little Freak 'ㅂ'*December 15, 2013 at 4:25 AM

    being a fan for years, sometimes, I'm still so surprised at what they do TT___TT

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  173. Governments have also been accused of sending in "undercover" protesters to spark off violence so that police can then move in and break up protests. I'm not sure if actual evidence of this can be found. I know that in the U.S. protesters and organized groups have been infiltrated and put under surveillance, watch lists etc.


    It's certainly a risky place to protest when our police forces are fully "militarized" right down to the local level. Even here large protests often do not get the media coverage they deserve because while we do not have an "official" government broadcast station our media is corporate controlled and pretty much the same thing.

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  174. I thought you were discussing Jonghyun when you talked about reaching out, since he is doing that. By being a celebrity, he puts it out there for people to know about, but if that isn't what you meant, then my apologies!


    Thank you again for continuing to read up on Korean society. You contribute more to the discussion than I think you know of.

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  175. In the U.S. being corporate controlled is almost the same as being controlled by the government. Since the line between corporations and our government has pretty much been stripped away.

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  176. The young have more to loose. If the government privatizes public transportation and health care young people will bear the weight of those decisions for many years to come.

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  177. But gay rights isn't the focus of the protests; it's a protest against the government's attempt to privatize the transportation which has led the students to discuss that they are not okay in a society that silences them, and that has led to the development of sub-protests, like gender equality and gay rights. It is nice that some fans are reading up further on the protest, but the majority only know about him and this particular lady and will think nothing more of the protests that affect Koreans as a whole.


    Even you seem to focus solely on the trans-gender student rather than the bulk of the movement, and it just proves to me further that it's true that everyone is only interested in the part where Jonghyun is involved and nothing else. It is certainly praise-worthy for Jonghyun to get involved, but it makes me sad to think that that is it, and this event will only be used to prove what a great person Jonghyun is in the future while this student will be buried in the recesses of his fans' minds.


    If I saw his fans sending as many messages of support to the student as they did to him, I wouldn't be so disappointed.

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  178. Did you just make a "misconceptions" joke? I see what you did there XD

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  179. Please don't say stuff like that

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  180. am from Tunisia,and we used to have (before the revolution and the Arab Spring) really corrupted media which only praise the corrupted system. But now i think 95% of the media are unbiased !!!

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  181. what? the year of revolution started from Tunisia in 2011!!

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  182. #FREESYRIA but without american intervention

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  183. really !! i don't know anything about her..

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  184. but jonghyun didn't actually "support" HOW ARE YOU protest , but another cause ....i don't think he will..(evil sm)

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  185. There is very little people outside of Korea can do to help other than give moral support through comments. I had often wondered why Korean young people did not push back more strongly against a social structure and government that puts so much pressure on them to educate themselves then discourages them from using what they have learned.


    Surely Korean women have much to protest. All citizens need to be concerned about a government and a corporate business structure that works to prop each other up. The propaganda campaign to push unfettered free market principles in the U.S. began to bear real fruit 30 years ago. The effects of this shift in ideologies is what brought about the recent global economic crisis.

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  186. To my knowledge, it does not occur within South Korea's protests, nor does the police force itself have a specialized unit of officers that has such (at least not in the 70s and 80s anyway) - the only closest example would be the infamous 'White Skull' unit, though they were more like elite buffed-up riot cops whose sole job was to grab for protest leaders (and beat anyone who got in the way) + were the ones issued batons for every one of them.

    I can't speak for the US, though the political division between 'libs and 'cons in Korea has a very bloody and tense history dating back since the ROK's first days as a country - protests getting violent, whether the police or protestors themselves acting out of line first, was and is a very common occurrence up to the point it's pretty much part of Korean society and culture, especially among youths - and it doesn't help that injury rates among cops themselves are also pretty high, considering that a lot of the time, they're only issued shields (professionals and reg officers are issued batons though).

    If you're in Korea and see protestors wearing facial masks and carrying improvised weapons themselves en masse while their leaders also encourage or do nothing about it, then the whole point of 'peaceful protest' goes straight out the window, as this photo shows.

    http://nadir.org/nadir/initiativ/agp/free/imf/asia/korea/0219daewoo3.jpg

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  187. I'm sorry? I don't understand what your comment has to do with mine?

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  188. I agree. I believe in peaceful protest of course. It's also a good thing for Koreans that their police force hasn't been militarized in the way it has here in the U.S. Often now a simple drug bust in the U.S. more resembles a military seek and destroy mission than it does a simple arrest. We kill innocent people all time using these "Rambo" tactics. Protesters here get shot with water cannons, rubber bullets, high powered mace sprays, and occasionally real bullets. There isn't a police force anywhere in the U.S. now that doesn't have a unit trained and ready with riot gear. And of course you know by now the government is looking at ALL of our phone calls, internet traffic etc. in the name of homeland security.

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  189. Never forget. ALL MEDIA IS BAISED.

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  190. I was responding to your disappointment that people here were only concerned about this issue because of the idol involvement. I think that may be because many of the people here are so young. Yesterday I was talking to someone in Korea but he was only 15. He was smart but he was only 15. I was also just piggy backing on your comments that the protests were about privatization.


    While LGBT issues and equality are laudable issues to support, they are social issues that are not as urgent as the current issue of privatizing the railroad and health services. Once these vital public services have been handed over to private industry it will be nearly impossible to reverse. Seeing this protest gives me hope that young Koreans will not stand idly by while their government actively participates in a plan to hand over it's responsibilities to the corporate class.

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  191. There is nothing inherently wrong with media being biased. What is scary is to have a government controlled media.

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  192. Yeah, that's whats gone wrong, the goverment practically erased those two points :( then what's the meaning of democracy...
    it's good that those student protested against govt.

    Well... if you compare it to N.K....x__x

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  193. nteresting, I actually much prefer Korea's police to look at the US as an example (partially that is, with Canada's RCMP as another inspire) when it comes to dealing with crime - from what I've been told from a few Koreans who live there, police in the US (most specifically, Hawaii, Minnesota and Washington) tend to take crime much, much more seriously, quickly and efficiently compared to their Korean counterparts today, not to mention more reliable.

    Mind you - water cannons, rubber bullets as well as tear gas have and still are used in Korea's police force when the situation calls for it, though real rounds fell out of use partly due to the negative connotation with the Gwangju Massacre (despite that it was committed by troops from a ROK special forces brigade, not police), as well as other incidences before.

    Ultimately though, I think a balance of 'neighborhood cop' and 'militarized cop' is what's the goal that should be achieved. In the case of the US, probably too leaned on the latter (though I'd say Mexico, Colombia and Russia's are far more further) and in Korea, too much in the former - after all, it's why my granddad (along with quite a few fellow veteran cops) quit the force.



    Sidenote - IIRC from what I learnt in a politics course in uni, what the US is going through right now seems to be a general state of paranoia, due to the high-profile leaks of sensitive information that damages relations with other countries and puts certain lives at risk, as well as the increase of cyber/digital-warfare between allies and enemies and threat of transnational terrorist groups operating globally.

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  194. I understand what you are saying. I've spent a lot of time reading and trying to understand the hyper competitive culture in S.Korea. It would be personally devastating for a student to lose everything they have worked for over a protest. All the more reason these students should be praised for standing up for themselves. Once you've reached the point of active, in the street, civil protest then the choice has been made. You run the risk of suffering the consequences.


    I would be interested to know how much these students are being linked with "communism" and perhaps even the North. I know that when people demand more from their government they are often accused of promoting socialist or communist causes. Anywhere in the "free" world when you start calling people communist it demonizes and simplifies the issue.

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  195. Coming from a cop family I can see why you would be more sympathetic. There was a time in our history when the motto of the American police was to "protect and serve", but that has changed drastically. There are many reasons why but now for many U.S. citizens the police are nothing more than jacked booted government thugs who are paid to harass and kill with impunity.

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  196. that movie was weird though =/ The boy was stlaker, he raped her and she got pregnant against her will and the baby died and ugh

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  197. "The danger Jonghyun puts himself in as a celebrity who supports them is very little compared to the dangers the students themselves are in. "


    I'm not totally sure about that, honestly.
    The focus should be in the students but jonghyun deserves all the praise. WHy? because if other idols see all the love he gets from being vocal about this, they might stand out for this too. And a little thing done by a famous figure can have way more repercussion than lots of efforts from an unkwon student

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